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Saturday, March 17, 2012

City Bike build, getting down to the bare frame.

There wasn't much left on the bike but I still had to get it down to the bare frame. First thing to go is the fork. I'm not planning on using the bike in trails anytime soon so no need for the extra weight of the suspension fork. It will be replaced by a leaner rigid fork.

Removal of a threaded fork is quite easy. After removing the stem by unscrewing the top bolt a few turns, punching it down with a hammer and pulling it out, you can start removing the fork by unscrewing the locking nut, that's the real big one. Then the rest comes off easy, the washer, unscrew the bearing cone off and then just slide the fork out. The bearing cups on the frame can be removed by gently tapping them inside the frame with a hammer and a long piece of steel like a worn out screwdriver. I've re-installed all those components back on the fork afterwards for storage. Until I locate a decent replacement fork, I don't want to lose those bits in my shop somewhere.



Next up is the crank arms and the sealed cartridge bottom bracket. Here you need bike specific tools like the puller and the sealed BB socket. There's no going around those.



To remove the cranks, start by taking off the locking nuts inside the crank arm with a 14mm socket wrench. Before you insert the puller tool, lubricate everything that moves on it. The friction you are about to create is the enemy of that tool. Protect your investment and make the job easier by taking a few seconds to do this. Clean the threads in the crank arm with an old tooth brush before you proceed. Screw the tool in by hand all the way in. If you are having a hard time doing this by hand, you have dirt in there, clean it again. If you don't screw it all the way in, you take a chance of pulling the threads out and if you do that, YOU are screwed! Once you have all that done, turn the handle and the arm should come right off.



Next is the sealed bottom bracket cartridge. Insert the special socket on the chain side and go clockwise in order to unscrew it. The thread is reversed on that side of the bike. Once it's out, remove the cartridge and proceed to remove the holder on the other side by unscrewing it counter-clockwise.




My seat post was stuck, so I installed a seat on it to use for leverage and managed to pull it out easily.

The last thing left to remove was the stickers. The best way to go about that is to heat the sticker using a hair blower on the warmest setting. This will melt the glue partially and help you remove the stickers with less residue on the frame. Whatever is still left can be removed with WD40 or other stuff made for that.


That's it for now. Next step will be to prepare the frame for primer and paint.


Don't forget to check out the how-to articles. 
 
Ride safe and free.

Gerry :)

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

I always enjoy (and learn something from) your projects :)

The Disabled Cyclist

Lindsay said...

I really wish I could find the time to do this with you, go get an old bike and follow along on your tutorial. So cool! I'm sure this will be immensely helpful to many!

Gerry Lauzon said...

Glad you guys are enjoying this.

Gerry :)

Keith said...

Will you be stripping the paint to the bare metal? Are you doing a DIY paint job or getting in powder coated somewhere. I'm a newbie just starting to do a similar restoration project with my old 1985 Raleigh Grand Prix that I pulled out of my parents' garage this past weekend. I don't have the tools to remove the crank and bottom bracket though.

Gerry Lauzon said...

Awesome Keith, I had a Raleigh Grand Prix myself a while back. No I won't be stripping the paint. I'm doing a spray can paint job and I need to keep the original finish underneath to protect the frame.

If you can't remove them, you can always just tape them if everything is working fine.

Good Luck

Gerry

Keith said...

Thx!

I decided to strip off my black paint and repaint it white with Rustoleum (primer & paint). I've sanded off about 70% of it already. I'm using an orbital sander and 60 grit paper which seems to make fairly quick work of it. The tighter areas I may have to do by hand...

My goal is to modernize the look of it while maintaining most original components!

Gerry Lauzon said...

Send me pictures, I'll post them to inspire others.

Gerry :)

georgiaboy said...

I'm glad to see you back online. cant wait to see what you do with it.